Introduction To The Workbook Lessons

(May 26, 1969)

A theoretical foundation such as the text is necessary as a background to make these exercises meaningful.  Yet it is the exercises which will make the goal possible.  An untrained mind can accomplish nothing.  It is the purpose of these exercises to train the mind to think along the lines which the course sets forth.

The exercises are very simple.  They do not require more than a few minutes, and it does not matter where or when you do them.  They need no preparation.  They are numbered, running from 1 to 365.  The training period is one year.  Do not undertake more than one exercise a day.

The purpose of these exercises is to train the mind to a different perception of everything in the world.  The workbook is divided into two sections, the first dealing with the undoing of what you see now, and the second with the restoration of sight.  It is recommended that each exercise be repeated several times a day, preferably in a different place each time, and if possible in every situation in which you spend any long period of time.  The purpose is to train the mind to generalize the lessons, so that you will understand that each of them is as applicable to one situation as it is to another.

Unless specified to the contrary, the exercise should be practiced with eyes open, since the aim is to learn how to see.  The only rule that should be followed throughout is to practice the exercises with great specificity.  Each one applies to every situation in which you find yourself, and to everything you see in it.  Each day’s exercises are planned around one central idea, the exercises themselves consisting of applying that idea to as many specifics as possible.  Be sure that you do not decide that there are some things you see to which the idea for the day is inapplicable.  The aim of the exercises will always be to increase the application of the idea to everything.  This will not require effort.  Only be sure that you make no exceptions in applying the idea.

Some of the ideas you will find hard to believe, and others will seem quite startling.  It does not matter.  You are merely asked to apply them to what you see.  You are not asked to judge them, or even to believe them.  You are asked only to use them.  It is their use which will give them meaning to you, and show you they are true. Remember only this; you need not believe them, you need not accept them and you need not welcome them.  Some of them you may actively resist.  None of this will matter, nor decrease their efficacy.  But allow yourself to make no exceptions in applying the ideas the exercises contain.  What ever your reactions to the ideas may be, use them.  Nothing more than this is required.